Ametrine Overview

Ametrine, also known as trystine or by its trade name as bolivianite, is a naturally occurring variety of quartz. It is a mixture of amethyst and citrine with zones of purple and yellow or orange. Almost all commercially available ametrine is mined in Bolivia. The colour of the zones visible within ametrine are due to differing oxidation states of iron within the crystal. The citrine segments have oxidized iron while the amethyst segments are unoxidized. The different oxidation states occur due to there being a temperature gradient across the crystal during its formation. Artificial ametrine is created from natural citrine through beta irradiation (which creates an amethyst portion), or from an amethyst that is turned into citrine through differential heat treatment.

Occurrence and Mining

Ametrine in the low price segment may stem from synthetic material. Green-yellow or golden-blue ametrine does not exist naturally. This gem only exists in Bolivia, it comes from the Ricón del Tigre area, from the Anahí mine. Legend has it that ametrine was first introduced to Europe by a conquistador’s gifts to the Spanish Queen in the 1600s, after he received a mine in Bolivia as a dowry when he married a princess from the native Ayoreos tribe

Quality Factors

Fine ametrine shows medium dark to moderately strong orange, and vivid to strong purple or violetish purple. Larger gems, usually those over five carats, tend to show the most intensely saturated hues.
Much of the faceted ametrine in the market is eye-clean, meaning it lacks eye-visible inclusions.
Connoisseurs prize imaginative designer cuts that display ametrine’s two colors in artfully blended or contrasting combinations.
When it comes to highly prized ametrine, size matters. That’s because the best, most intense citrine and amethyst colors are found in larger sizes, usually over 5 carats.

Identification

Color

Purple , Yellow

Crystal habit

6-sided prism ending in 6-sided pyramid 

Twinning

Dauphine law and Brazil law

Cleavage

none

Fracture

Conchoidal

Mohs scale 

7 hardness

Lustre

Vitreous

Streak

white

Diaphaneity

Transparent to translucent

Specific gravity

2.65

Solubility

Insoluble in common solvents

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