Rose Quartz Overview

One of the most popular crystals is the rose quartz. The use of rose quartz is said to date back as far as 7000 BC. It’s also been claimed that Egyptian and Roman women used rose quartz face masks to clear their complexions and prevent wrinkles. Today rose quartz is often used as jewelry, for meditation, or as decoration in homes or office spaces. While there’s no scientific evidence that rose quartz crystals offer any health benefits, they’re still commonly used for healing purposes.

Occurrence and Minning

Quartz is a defining constituent of granite and other felsic igneous rocks. It is very common in sedimentary rocks such as sandstone and shale. It is a common constituent of schist, gneiss, quartzite and other metamorphic rocks. Quartz has the lowest potential for weathering in the Goldich dissolution series and consequently it is very common as a residual mineral in stream sediments and residual soils. Generally a high presence of quartz suggests a “mature” rock, since it indicates the rock has been heavily reworked and quartz was the primary mineral that endured heavy weathering. While the majority of quartz crystallizes from molten magma, quartz also chemically precipitates from hot hydrothermal veins as gangue, sometimes with ore minerals like gold, silver and copper. Large crystals of quartz are found in magmatic pegmatites. Well-formed crystals may reach several meters in length and weigh hundreds of kilograms. Naturally occurring quartz crystals of extremely high purity, necessary for the crucibles and other equipment used for growing silicon wafers in the semiconductor industry, are expensive and rare. A major mining location for high purity quartz is the Spruce Pine Gem Mine in Spruce Pine, North Carolina, United States. Quartz may also be found in Caldoveiro Peak, in Asturias, Spain. The largest documented single crystal of quartz was found near Itapore, Goiaz, Brazil; it measured approximately 6.1×1.5×1.5 m and weighed 39,916 kilograms.[51] Quartz is extracted from open pit mines. Miners occasionally use explosives to expose deep pockets of quartz. More frequently, bulldozers and backhoes are used to remove soil and clay and expose quartz veins, which are then worked using hand tools. Care must be taken to avoid sudden temperature changes that may damage the crystals.

Quality Factors

Rose quartz gets its name from its delicate pink color, ranging from very light pink (almost white) to medium-dark pink.
Tiny inclusions are responsible for the translucent appearance of most rose quartz. Finest-quality rose quartz is often transparent, so it’s usually faceted.
The inclusions in rose quartz can create a display of asterism when the gem is cut as a cabochon. It might also be faceted or fashioned into beads.
Rose quartz is available in sizes large enough to inspire gem designers and carvers. Fashioned gems in larger sizes often display more intense color.

Identification

Formula mass

60.083 g·mol−1

Color

Colorless through various colors to black

Twinning

Common Dauphine law, Brazil law and Japan law

Crystal habit

6-sided prism ending in 6-sided pyramid (typical), drusy, fine-grained to microcrystalline, massive

Cleavage

{0110} Indistinct

Fracture

Conchoidal

Tenacity

Brittle

Mohs scale hardness

7 â€“ lower in impure varieties (defining mineral)

Luster

Vitreous â€“ waxy to dull when massive

Birefringence

+0.009 (B-G interval)

Specific gravity

2.65; variable 2.59–2.63 in impure varieties

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